Interview with L.D. Porter

Winter Newsletter

What takes place in the mind can be “limited” to mental thought… It does not necessarily include the essence of the person or the issue to be healed.

If we define the issue or the condition, we are creating its own paradigm which is not real or representative.

The condition cannot be represented by the intellect alone.

Therefore the approach toward healing must be outside of an intellectual concept which creates a given paradigm and limits the full reality.

L.D.


Interview with L.D. Porter

Questions from Bob and Diane Beale

Bob: When you’re working with clients, do you have visual pictures of what’s going on with them?

LD: A lot of times I do. You might describe it as ‘silhouettes’ or shadows. When I go over a body, I’ll see areas that don’t look right. Then we investigate those areas, we talk to the client and ask them about details of those areas. We might find that those areas are connected to a childhood trauma or an abuse (those are the big issues).

B: So the visual pictures you get can be traced back to earlier times in this or another life that experienced trauma?

L: Yes. It sets a pattern in the body where perhaps years later or in other lifetimes it’s realized into a dysfunction or illness.

Diane: What about something that is obviously not from a past-life experience, like for instance food poisoning or being shot by a gun? Do you work on those things as well?

L: Yes. For instance, right after the hurricane in Florida a man called me who had a severe swelling in his neck. I saw a swampy area, like being in water. I asked him if he’d been in water recently. He said, “Yes, my house kind of flooded and I was underneath my house working. The doctors didn’t know what it was and gave me something for inflammation that didn’t help much.”

I saw that it was a snakebite and that’s what we worked with. I have his testimony where the pain and swelling went down on that very same day. He was happy about that and asked me about other things. We found out he had a prostate issue, so we worked with that.

B: You saw the prostate problem?

L: We saw that, but it’s not like I’m 100% right on these seeing these things, but I did see it.

B: Sometimes there may be a misdiagnosis?

L: As you might know I disagree with the term ‘diagnosis.’ It’s a rationally arrived term which does not involve emotions, past lives, traumas of the past and so forth. It may be only looking at symptoms or looking at what some part of the body, blood, etc. looks like right now.

So to me the word ‘diagnosis’ puts one in a generalized framework.

If you have a thousand picture frames and you put them all in the same framework, how can you improve the painting? That’s what they’re doing. That’s what the system is all about – putting a name to an issue.

I don’t criticize the system of diagnosis, but I do say “I don’t do diagnosis per se.”

We’re not looking at the internal symptoms, we’re looking at the cause and the effects and what might be done to the inside cause. If you have an itch, we don’t treat the skin with calamine lotion. We look inside and at the blood chemistry and we look at what might have caused the blood chemistry. It could be diet, atmosphere, or other outside forces.

B: It sounds like you don’t put a label on what’s malfunctioning, you just see something that’s not functioning properly.

L: Yes, because if we see something that we put a label on it might change very quickly and we’re stuck with it. A food the person needs today might find the body saturated with tomorrow. Therefore, prescribing a diet might not be accurate because we change everyday as to what the body needs. Hopefully we’re able to see that.

We’ll see that if the body has a craving for a food one day, it might need that, then it changes.

B: When you say “we,” who are you referring to?

L: “We” are the nonphysical group that guides the process.

D: If a person believes or does not believe in “Spiritual healing” or if they are open-minded or not open-minded in general, have you noticed that it makes a difference to the outcome?

L: It may or may not. It’s different for everyone. Normally I don’t deal in beliefs. Belief is an intellectual thought and they are important a lot of the time. But it’s not where I work. A lot of my clients are not even aware that I’m working on them.

I had a Korean client this week who had a lot of digestive issues that I couldn’t get to for a week. She said she started getting better from the time we made the appointment. And sure enough she’s doing much better now. A lot of that was done before she or even before I was aware of it.

The conscious belief system can be important like having a positive attitude, but it’s not what I do.

The belief system is in the conceptual mind and there is no way I can explain what I do conceptually.

B: You have a sense of being guided by non-corporeal entities. Is that where the healing starts?

L: It’s like coming up to a stop sign and you just know you should turn right. It can get complex. You know you should go to the stomach and you start to see that it’s somehow connected to the lung. Most people wouldn’t think the stomach would be connected to the lung, but upon further examination, there are alternative connections from the stomach to the lung. Those two can be connected. Then we go on to the heart and see connections there. That’s a lot of the kind of work I do internally in the body.

If it’s a liver problem, we see what is connected to the liver and see if there is excessive drinking or some kind of toxic stress or whatever.

It’s like a maze and we’re told to go towards a direction.

B: So you can see relationships in a logical sense and see connections that perhaps wouldn’t be detected in the medical field.

L: Yes. They don’t have the methods to see the subtleties that are happening in the body. They someday will probably have the means to do this, or the understanding.
It’s something I have to deal with all the time. People tell me they have this or this….

D: “How do you know that? Who told you so?”

It might be something like fibromyalgia, which is the most generalized diagnosis in the world. You could have anything.

“How many hot dogs did you have today? Five? Well, let’s start there.”

B: It sounds like there’s a lot of medical misdiagnosis that occurs in our society. The treatments may contribute to the problem instead of eliminate it.

L: First of all you have to redefine diagnosis to something that pinpoints and works. For example, we might find connections to an old wound, like injuries sustained in a car wreck, but in order to be effective, we need to be aware of as many other surrounding circumstances as possible.

B: It sounds like you have a very unique skill and I know there has been a discussion before on how this came about, but could you talk about how you think this came about?

D: Did it come all at once, or do you feel that you’ve always had this ability?

L: I grew up on a farm where you know the trees and the animals. You attune to, ‘feel’ nature and things just comes to you.

B: Yes, but there are a lot of kids who grow up on farms who don’t have these abilities.

D: When did you realize you had gifts that others didn’t have?

L: Well back in college. With a girlfriend I was seeing what was happening with other people and predicting things. It just continued to grow. Then I met some friends who were psychics and they substantiated what I was doing even more.

Meeting Solomon gave me a framework for what I do.

D: Please say something about Solomon for the record.

L: Solomon was an Amish healer I was with 2 or 3 days a week for 3 years. This was in Indiana. I watched what he did and saw his clients come and go. I realized that what seemed superfluous, worked on people a lot of the time. The brain tumors disappeared, the circulation blockages were no longer, and on and on… We can discuss more about Solomon in another interview.